Although there are many white antiracists who do fight and will continue to fight against the operations of white power, and while it is true that the regulatory power of whiteness will invariably attempt to undermine such efforts, it is important that white antiracists realize how much is at stake. While antiracist whites take time to get their shit together, a luxury that is a species of privilege, Black bodies and bodies of color continue to suffer, their bodies cry out for the political and existential urgency for the immediate undoing of the oppressive operations of whiteness. Here, the very notion of the temporal gets racialized. My point here is that even as whites take the time to theorize the complexity of whiteness, revealing its various modes of resistance to radical transformation, Black bodies continue to endure tremendous pain and suffering.

Doing theory in the service of undoing whiteness comes with its own snares and seductions, its own comfort zones, and reinscription of distances. Whites who deploy theory in the service of fighting against white racism must caution against the seduction of white narcissism, the recentering of whiteness, even if it is the object of critical reflection, and, hence, the process of sequestration from the real world of weeping, suffering, and traumatized Black bodies impacted by the operations of white power. As antiracist whites continue to make mistakes and continue to falter in the face of institutional interpellation and habituated racist reflexes, tomorrow, a Black body will be murdered as it innocently reaches for its wallet. The sheer weight of this reality mocks the patience of theory.
George Yancy, Black Bodies, White Gazes (via wretchedoftheearth)

panatmansam:

Conditioning your happiness on other people or any external thing is attachment and will lead to suffering.

(via enduring-observer)

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

(via cakekrust)

schweiber:

front page of the nyt is literally a shitty photoblog

schweiber:

front page of the nyt is literally a shitty photoblog

(via presidentraggy)

nos3bleeds:

Ok so i don’t know how many of you saw my embroidery set from last year showing women in film statistics, but to tie in with International Women’s day over on Screenqueens and the learning I’ve done in the past year, I’ve added a couple more. 

(via yoshimiatetherobots)

Source. This is a real thing. It’s happening.

HIV Has Been Cured in a Child for the First Time

HIV Cure: New Drug ‘Vacc-4x’ May Become First Functional Cure Against the Virus

The Man Who Had HIV and Now Does Not

This is HUGE news, and of course no one is talking about it because it is not a part of popular culture. For the first time in the history of the world, there is a possible preventative cure for one of the most deadliest viral diseases to have entered the human gene pool. There is hope for those who have been diagnosed with a disease that may have given them only 20 or so years to live. This breakthrough in the science/pharmaceutical community means that other viral diseases and genetic mutations that were once incurable are now on the table for complete eradication. I’m absolutely seething that no one is talking about this on the news 24/7.

(via i-am-thegay)

Pattern of sadness

Something I have realized today is that sadness is a domino effect. Because you are sad you put up a hurtful defense mechanism or avoid people. Because of that, others think you do not like them and don’t reach out to you. Because of that, you think others do not like you. You become sadder, and it continues to affect your relationships.

Everything I do affects my relationships, and what I realize now too that everything I don’t do does too. I’ve been on both sides of the sadness, and to everyone I’ve inadvertently created a distance or disconnect… I am sorry.

And for the next time I feel no one likes me, I have to remember to reach out, not hide.

I'm a social justice re-blogger. I'm still coming up with my own ideas, but sometimes they aren't even relevant. I am trying to find my place in the movement towards social justice with my white, cis, able and heterosexual privilege. I'm an advocate for many movements and I think this is the place to spread the ideas that people need to hear.

view archive



Ask me anything